Sachin Tendulkar

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Personal information

Full name Sachin Ramesh Tendulkar
Born 24 April 1973
Mumbai, Maharashtra, India
Batting Right-handed
Bowling Right-arm medium fast, leg break, off break
Role Batsman

International information

National side India (1989–2013)
Test debut (Cap 187) 15 November 1989 v Pakistan
Last Test 14 November 2013 v West Indies
ODI debut (Cap 74) 3 April 1996 v Sri Lanka
Last ODI 18 December 1989 v Pakistan
ODI shirt no. 10
Only T20I (Cap 11) 1 December 2006 v South Africa

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Sachin Ramesh Tendulkar (born 24 April 1973) is a former international cricketer of India who served as captain of the Indian national team. He is widely regarded as one of the greatest batsmen in the history of cricket. He is the highest run scorer of all time in international cricket, and the only player to have scored one hundred international centuries, the first batsman to score a double century in a One Day International (ODI), the holder of the record for the most runs in both Test and ODI cricket, and the only player to complete more than 30,000 runs in international cricket. In 2013, he was the only Indian cricketer included in an all-time Test World XI named to mark the 150th anniversary of Wisden Cricketers’ Almanack. He is affectionately known as “Little Master” or “Master Blaster”.Tendulkar took up cricket at the age of eleven, made his Test debut on 15 November 1989 against Pakistan in Karachi at the age of sixteen, and went on to represent Mumbai domestically and India internationally for close to twenty-four years. In 2002, halfway through his career, Wisden Cricketers’ Almanack ranked him the second-greatest Test batsman of all time, behind Don Bradman, and the second-greatest ODI batsman of all time, behind Viv Richards. Later in his career, Tendulkar was a part of the Indian team that won the 2011 World Cup, his first win in six World Cup appearances for India. He had previously been named “Player of the Tournament” at the 2003 edition of the tournament, held in South Africa.

Tendulkar received the Arjuna Award in 1994 for his outstanding sporting achievement, the Khel Ratna award in 1997, India’s highest sporting honour, and the Padma Shri and Padma Vibhushan awards in 1999 and 2008, respectively, India’s fourth- and second-highest civilian awards. After a few hours of his final match on 16 November 2013, the Prime Minister’s Office announced the decision to award him the Bharat Ratna, India’s highest civilian award. He is the youngest recipient to date and the first ever sportsperson to receive the award. He also won the 2010 Sir Garfield Sobers Trophy for cricketer of the year at the ICC awards. In 2012, Tendulkar was nominated to the Rajya Sabha, the upper house of the Parliament of India. He was also the first sportsperson and the first person without an aviation background to be awarded the honorary rank of group captain by the Indian Air Force. In 2012, he was named an Honorary Member of the Order of Australia. In 2010, Time magazine included Sachin in its annual Time 100 list as one of the “Most Influential People in the World”.In December 2012, Tendulkar announced his retirement from ODIs. He retired from Twenty20 cricket in October 2013 and subsequently retired from all forms of cricket on 16 November 2013 after playing his 200th Test match, against the West Indies in Mumbai’s Wankhede Stadium. Tendulkar played 664 international cricket matches in total, scoring 34,357 runs. In 2019, Tendulkar was inducted into the ICC Cricket Hall of Fame.


Early years

Tendulkar was born at Nirmal Nursing Home in Dadar, Bombay on 24 April 1973 to a Rajapur Saraswat Brahmin maharastrian famiy His father, Ramesh Tendulkar, was a well-known Marathi novelist & poet and his mother, Rajni, worked in the insurance industry. Ramesh named Tendulkar after his favourite music director, Sachin Dev Burman. Tendulkar has three elder siblings: two half-brothers Nitin and Ajit, and a half-sister Savita. They were Ramesh’s children by his first wife, who died after the birth of her third child. 

Tendulkar spent his formative years in the Sahitya Sahawas Cooperative Housing Society in Bandra (East). As a young boy, Tendulkar was considered a bully, and often picked up fights with new children in his school. He also showed an interest in tennis, idolizing John McEnroe. To help curb his mischievous and bullying tendencies, Ajit introduced the young Sachin to cricket in 1984. He introduced him to Ramakant Achrekar, a famous cricket coach and a club cricketer of repute, at Shivaji Park, Dadar. In the first meeting, the young Sachin did not play his best. Ajit told Achrekar that he was feeling self-conscious due to the coach observing him, and was not displaying his natural game. Ajit requested the coach to give him another chance at playing, but watch while hiding behind a tree. This time, Sachin, apparently unobserved, played much better and was accepted at Achernar’s academy. 

Achrekar was impressed with Tendulkar’s talent and advised him to shift his schooling to Sharadashram Vidyamandir (English) High School, a school at Dadar which had a dominant cricket team and had produced many notable cricketers. Prior to this, Tendulkar had attended the Indian Education Society’s New English School in Bandra (East). He was also coached under the guidance of Achrekar at Shivaji Park in the mornings and evenings. Tendulkar would practice for hours on end in the nets. If he became exhausted, Achrekar would put a one-rupee coin on the top of the stumps, and the bowler who dismissed Tendulkar would get the coin. If Tendulkar passed the whole session without getting dismissed, the coach would give him the coin. Tendulkar now considers the 13 coins he won then as some of his most prized possessions. He moved in with his aunt and uncle, who lived near Shivaji Park, during this period, due to his hectic schedule. Meanwhile, at school, he developed a reputation as a child prodigy. He had become a common conversation point in local cricketing circles, where there were suggestions already that he would become one of the greats. Sachin consistently featured in the school team in the Matunga Gujarati Seva Mandal (MGSM) Shield. Besides school cricket, he also played club cricket, initially representing John Bright Cricket Club in Bombay’s premier club cricket tournament, the Kanga League, and later went on to play for the Cricket Club of India. In 1987, at the age of 14, he attended the MRF Pace Foundation in Madras (now Chennai) to train as a fast bowler, but the Australian fast bowler Dennis Lillee, who took a world record 355 Test wickets, was unimpressed, suggesting that Tendulkar focus on his batting instead. On 20 January 1987, he also turned out as substitute for Imran Khan’s side in an exhibition game at Brabourne Stadium in Bombay, to mark the golden jubilee of Cricket Club of India. A couple of months later, former Indian batsman Sunil Gavaskar gave him a pair of his own ultra light pads and consoled him to not get disheartened for not getting the Bombay Cricket Association’s “Best junior cricket award” (He was 14 years that time). “It was the greatest source of encouragement for me,” Tendulkar said nearly 20 years later after surpassing Gavaskar’s world record of 34 Test centuries. Sachin served as a ball boy in the 1987 Cricket World Cup when India played against England in the semifinal in Bombay. In his season in 1988, Tendulkar scored a century in every innings he played. He was involved in an unbroken 664-run partnership in a Lord Harris Shield inter-school game against St. Xavier’s High School in 1988 with his friend and teammate Vinod Kambli, who would also go on to represent India. The destructive pair reduced one bowler to tears and made the rest of the opposition unwilling to continue the game. Tendulkar scored 326 (not out) in this innings and scored over a thousand runs in the tournament. This was a record partnership in any form of cricket until 2006, when it was broken by two under-13 batsmen in a match held at Hyderabad in India.


Early domestic career

On 14 November 1987, the 14-year-old Tendulkar was selected to represent Bombay in the Ranji Trophy, India’s premier domestic First-class cricket tournament, for the 1987–88 season. However, he was not selected for the final eleven in any of the matches, though he was often used as a substitute fielder. He narrowly missed out on playing alongside his idol Gavaskar, who had retired from all forms of cricket after the 1987 Cricket World Cup A year later, on 11 December 1988, aged 15 years and 232 days, Tendulkar made his debut for Bombay against Gujarat at Wankhede stadium and scored 100 not out in that match, making him the youngest Indian to score a century on debut in first-class cricket. He was selected to play for the team by the then Bombay captain Dilip Vengsarkar after watching him easily playing India’s best fast bowler at the time, Kapil Dev, in the Wankhede Stadium’s Cricket practice nets, where the Indian team had come to play against the touring New Zealand team. He followed this by scoring a century in his first Deodhar and Duleep Trophies, which are also Indian domestic tournaments. 

Tendulkar finished the 1988–89 Ranji Trophy season as Bombay’s highest run-scorer. He scored 583 runs at an average of 67.77, and was the eighth-highest run-scorer overall. In 1995- 96 Irani trophy he captained Mumbai against Rest of India team. He also made an unbeaten century in the Irani Trophy match against Delhi at the start of the 1989–90 season, playing for the Rest of India. Sachin was picked for a young Indian team to tour England twice, under the Star Cricket Club banner in 1988 and 1989. In the famous 1990–91 Ranji Trophy final, in which Haryana defeated Bombay by two runs after leading in the first innings, Tendulkar’s 96 from 75 balls was a key to giving Bombay a chance of victory as it attempted to chase 355 from only 70 overs on the final day. 

In the final of 1995 Ranji trophy, Tendulkar scored 140 and 139 versus Punjab at Wankhede playing as a captain. Against Haydrabad 53, 128 in 2000, 105, 43 against Bengal in 2007 are the innings he played for Mumbai in the final of Ranji trophy at Wankhede stadium. 

His first double century (204*) was for Mumbai while playing against the visiting Australian team at the Brabourne Stadium in 1998. He is the only player to score a century on debut in all three of his domestic first-class tournaments (the Ranji, Irani, and Duleep Trophies). Another double century was an innings of 233* against Tamil Nadu in the semi-finals of the 2000 Ranji Trophy, which he regards as one of the best innings of his career. 

Tendulkar was part of 5 Ranji trophy finals in which Mumbai won 4. 


International career

Raj Singh Dungarpur is credited for the selection of Tendulkar for the Indian tour of Pakistan in late 1989, after one first class season. The Indian selection committee had shown interest in selecting Tendulkar for the tour of the West Indies held earlier that year, but eventually did not select him, as they did not want him to be exposed to the dominant fast bowlers of the West Indies so early in his career. Tendulkar made his Test debut against Pakistan in Karachi in November 1989 aged 16 years and 205 days. He made 15 runs, being bowled by Waqar Younis, who also made his debut in that match, but was noted for how he handled numerous blows to his body at the hands of the Pakistani pace attack. In the fourth and final Test in Sialkot, he was hit on the nose by a bouncer bowled by Younis, but he declined medical assistance and continued to bat even as he gushed blood from it. In a 20-over exhibition game in Peshawar, held in parallel with the bilateral series, Tendulkar made 53 runs off 18 balls, including an over in which he scored 27 runs (6, 4, 0, 6, 6, 6) off leg-spinner Abdul Qadir. This was later called “one of the best innings I have seen” by the then Indian captain Krishnamachari Srikkanth. In all, he scored 215 runs at an average of 35.83 in the Test series, and was dismissed without scoring a run in the only One Day International (ODI) he played. Thus Sachin Tendulkar became the youngest player to debut for India in Tests at the age of 16 years and 205 days and also the youngest player to debut for India in ODIs at the age of 16 years and 238 days. 

The series was followed by a tour of New Zealand in which he scored 117 runs at an average of 29.25 in Tests including an innings of 88 in the second Test. He was dismissed without scoring in one of the two one-day games he played, and scored 36 in the other. On his next tour, a summer tour to England of 1990, on 14 August, he became the second youngest cricketer to score a Test century as he made 119 not out in the second Test at Old Trafford in Manchester, an innings which contributed to a draw and saved India from certain defeat in the match. Wisden described his innings as “a disciplined display of immense maturity” and also wrote: 

He looked the embodiment of India’s famous opener, Gavaskar, and indeed was wearing a pair of his pads. While he displayed a full repertoire of strokes in compiling his maiden Test hundred, most remarkable were his off-side shots from the back foot. Though only 5ft 5in tall, he was still able to control without difficulty short deliveries from the English pacemen.

Tendulkar further enhanced his reputation as a future great during the 1991–92 tour of Australia held before the 1992 Cricket World Cup, that included an unbeaten 148 in the third Test at Sydney, making him the youngest batsman to score a century in Australia. He then scored 114 on a fast, bouncing pitch in the final Test at Perth against a pace attack comprising Merv Hughes, Bruce Reid and Craig McDermott. Hughes commented to Allan Border at the time that “This little prick’s going to get more runs than you, AB.” 

  • 2003 Cricket World Cup

Tendulkar made 673 runs in 11 matches in the 2003 Cricket World Cup, helping India reach the final. While Australia retained the trophy that they had won in 1999, Tendulkar was given the Man of the Tournament award.

He continued to score heavily in ODI cricket that year, with two hundreds in a tri-series involving New Zealand and Australia. As a part-time bowler, he dismissed an exhausted centurion, Matthew Hayden in the tri-series final.

  • 2007 Cricket World Cup debacle

During the preparation for the 2007 World Cup, Tendulkar’s attitude was criticised by Indian team coach Greg Chappell. Chappell reportedly felt that Tendulkar would be more useful down the order, while the latter felt that he would be better off opening the innings, the role he had played for most of his career. Chappell also believed that Tendulkar’s repeated failures were hurting the team’s chances. In a rare show of emotion, Tendulkar hit out at the comments attributed to Chappell by pointing out that no coach had ever suggested his attitude towards cricket was incorrect. On 7 April 2007, the Board of Control for Cricket in India issued a notice to Tendulkar asking for an explanation for his comments made to the media. Chappell subsequently resigned as coach but said that this affair had no bearing on his decision and that he and Tendulkar were on good terms.

At the World Cup in the West Indies, Tendulkar and the Indian cricket team led by Rahul Dravid had a dismal campaign. Tendulkar, who was pushed to bat lower down the order had scores of 7 against Bangladesh, 57 not out against Bermuda and 0 against Sri Lanka. As a result, former Australian captain Ian Chappell, brother of Greg, called for Tendulkar to retire in his newspaper column.

After the loss against Bangladesh and Sri Lanka, Tendulkar was into depression and taught to retire from Cricket. But Viv Richards and Ajit Tendulkar stopped him. According to Sachin, 23 March 2007, the loss against minnows Bangladesh is one of the worst days of his cricketing career.

  • 2011 Cricket World Cup and after

From February to April, Bangladesh, India, and Sri Lanka hosted the 2011 World Cup. Amassing 482 runs at an average of 53.55 including two centuries, Tendulkar was India’s leading run-scorer for the tournament; only Tillakaratne Dilshan of Sri Lanka scored more runs in the 2011 tournament, and was named in the ICC ‘Team of the Tournament’. India defeated Sri Lanka in the final. Shortly after the victory, Tendulkar commented that “Winning the World Cup is the proudest moment of my life. … I couldn’t control my tears of joy.”

India were due to tour the West Indies in June, although Tendulkar chose not to participate. He returned to the squad in July for India’s tour of England. Throughout the tour there was much hype in the media about whether Tendulkar would reach his 100th century in international cricket (Test and ODIs combined). However, his highest score in the Tests was 91; Tendulkar averaged 34.12 in the series as England won 4–0 as they deposed India as the No. 1 ranked Test side. The injury Tendulkar sustained to his right foot in 2001 flared up and as a result he was ruled out of the ODI series that followed. Tendulkar created another record on 8 November 2011 when he became the first cricketer to score 15,000 runs in Test cricket, during the opening Test match against the West Indies at the Feroz Shah Kotla Stadium in New Delhi. For his performances in 2011, he was named in the World Test XI by the ICC.

Ian Chappell was not happy with Sachin’s performance after India’s tour of Australia. He says that Sachin’s quest for his 100th hundred has proved to be a hurdle for the entire team and has hampered their performance on the Tour of Australia. Former India World Cup winning captain and all-rounder Kapil Dev has also voiced his opinion that Sachin should have retired from ODI’s after the World Cup. Former Australian fast bowler, Geoff Lawson, has said that Sachin has the right to decide when to quit although he adds that Tendulkar should not delay it for too long. The selection committee of BCCI expectedly included Sachin in the national Test squad for the upcoming series against New Zealand commencing in August 2012.


Indian Premier League and Champions League

Tendulkar was made the Icon player and captain for his home side, the Mumbai Indians in the inaugural Indian Premier League Twenty20 competition in 2008. As an icon player, he was signed for a sum of US$1,121,250, 15% more than the second-highest paid player in the team, Sanath Jayasuriya.

In 2010 edition of Indian Premier League, Mumbai Indians reached the final of the tournament. Tendulkar made 618 runs in 14 innings during the tournament, breaking Shaun Marsh’s record of most runs in an IPL season. He was declared player of the tournament for his performance during the season. He also won Best Batsman and Best Captain awards at 2010 IPL Awards ceremony. Sachin has scored more than 500 runs in IPL in two different seasons as a captain.

Sachin Tendulkar captained Mumbai Indians in 4 league matches of second edition of the league. He scored 68 in the first match and 48 against Guyana. But Mumbai Indians failed to qualify for semifinals after losing the initial two matches. Tendulkar scored 135 runs.

In the 2011 IPL, against Kochi Tuskers Kerala, Tendulkar scored his maiden Twenty20 hundred. He scored 100 not out off 66 balls. In 2013, Sachin retired from Indian Premier League and in 2014 he was appointed as the Mumbai Indian’s ‘Team Icon’. His last match for the team was the final of the 2013 Champions League, where he scored 14 runs in an Indians victory. In his 78 matches in the IPL, Tendulkar scored a total of 2,334 runs; at the time of his retirement he was the fifth-highest run-scorer in the competition’s history. Mumbai Indians retired his number 10 jersey as a tribute to Tendulkar.


Legacy

Sachin Tendulkar is the leading run scorer in Tests, with 15,921 runs, as well as in One-Day Internationals, with 18,426 runs. He is the only player to score more than 30,000 runs in all forms of international cricket (Tests, ODIs and Twenty20 Internationals). He is the 16th player and the first Indian to score 50,000 runs in all forms of domestic and international recognised cricket (First-class, List A and Twenty20). He achieved this feat on 5 October 2013, during a Champions League Twenty20 match for his IPL team Mumbai Indians against Trinidad and Tobago.

In 2012, Tendulkar was ranked number 8 in Outlook India’s poll of the Greatest Indian.

He also holds the record of the highest number of centuries in both Tests (51) and ODIs (49) as well as in Tests and ODIs combined (100). On 16 March 2012, Tendulkar scored his 100th international hundred. It came against Bangladesh in the league matches of Asia Cup 2012. He is also the only player to score fifty centuries in Test cricket, and the first to score fifty centuries in all international cricket combined. He also holds the world record for playing the highest number of Test matches (200) and ODI matches (463). Tendulkar has been part of most wins by an Indian in both Test cricket with 72 wins and ODIs with 234 wins and is third in the world in ODI victories after Ricky Ponting (262 wins), Mahela Jayawardene (241 wins).

Tendulkar has scored over 1,000 runs in a calendar year in ODIs 7 times, and in 1998 he scored 1,894 runs, the record for the highest number of runs scored by any player in a single calendar year for One-Day Internationals. He is the first male cricketer to score a double-century in one-day cricket.

He has been Man of the Match 13 times in Test matches and Man of the Series four times, out of them twice in the Border-Gavaskar Trophy against Australia. The performances earned him respect from Australian cricket fans and players. Similarly he has been Man of the Match 62 times in One day International matches and Man of the Series 15 times. He became the first batsman to score 12,000, 13,000, 14,000 and 15,000 runs in Test cricket, having also been the third batsman and the first Indian to pass 11,000 runs in that form of the game. He was also the first player to score 10,000 runs in one-day internationals, and also the first player to cross every subsequent 1,000-run mark that has been crossed in ODI cricket history. In the fourth Test of the 2008–09 Border-Gavaskar Trophy against Australia at Nagpur on 6 November 2008, Tendulkar surpassed Australia’s Allan Border to become the player to cross the 50-run mark the most times in Test cricket history, and also the second ever player to score 11 Test centuries against Australia, tying with Sir Jack Hobbs of England more than 70 years previously. On 8 November 2011, Tendulkar became the first batsman to score 15,000 runs in Test Cricket.

Tendulkar has consistently done well in Cricket World Cups. He was the highest run scorer of the 1996 Cricket World Cup with a total of 523 runs and also of the 2003 Cricket World Cup with 673 runs. After his century against England during group stages of 2011 Cricket World Cup, he became the player to hit most centuries in Cricket World Cups with six centuries and the first player to score 2000 runs in World Cup cricket.

Tendulkar was also one half of the most prolific Test cricket partnership to date, alongside Rahul Dravid. Batting together, they scored 6920 runs for India at a partnership average of over fifty runs.

  • National honours
  • 1994 – Arjuna Award, by the Government of India in recognition of his outstanding achievement in sports. 
  • 1997–98 – Rajiv Gandhi Khel Ratna, India’s highest honour given for achievement in sports.
  • 1999 – Padma Shri, India’s fourth-highest civilian award. 
  • 2001 – Maharashtra Bhushan Award, Maharashtra State’s highest Civilian Award.
  • 2008 – Padma Vibhushan, India’s second-highest civilian award. 
  • 2014 – Bharat Ratna, India’s highest civilian award. 
  • Other honours
  • 1997 – Wisden Cricketer of the Year 
  • 1998, 2010 – Wisden Leading Cricketer in the World. 
  • 2001 – Mumbai Cricket Association renamed Wankhede stadium’s a stand after Sachin Tendulkar. 
  • 2002 – In commemorating Tendulkar’s feat of equalling Don Bradman’s 29 centuries in Test Cricket, automotive company Ferrari invited him to its paddock in Silverstone on the eve of the British Grand Prix on 23 July, to receive a Ferrari 360 Modena from the F1 world champion Michael Schumacher. 
  • 2003 – Player of the tournament in 2003 Cricket World Cup. 
  • 2004, 2007, 2010 – ICC World ODI XI. 
  • 2006-07, 2009-10 – Polly Umrigar Award for International cricketer of the year 
  • 2009, 2010, 2011 – ICC World Test XI. 
  • 2010 – Outstanding Achievement in Sport and the Peoples Choice Award at The Asian Awards in London. 
  • 2010 – Sir Garfield Sobers Trophy for cricketer of the year. 
  • 2010 – LG People’s Choice Award. 
  • 2010 – Made an Honorary group captain by the Indian Air Force. 
  • 2011 – Castrol Indian Cricketer of the Year award. 
  • 2012 – Wisden India Outstanding Achievement award. 
  • 2012 – Honorary Member of the Order of Australia, given by the Australian government. 
  • 2013 – Indian Postal Service released a stamp of Tendulkar and he became the second Indian after Mother Teresa to have such stamp released in their lifetime. 
  • 2014 – ESPNCricinfo Cricketer of the Generation. 
  • 2017 – The Asian Awards Fellowship Award at the 7th Asian Awards. 
  • 2019 – Inducted into the ICC Cricket Hall of Fame
  • 2020 – Laureus World Sports Award for Best Sporting Moment (2000–2020) 

Personal life

  • Family

On 24 May 1995, Tendulkar married Anjali Mehta (b. 1967), a paediatrician of Gujarati origin, whom he had first met in 1990. Anjali Mehta decided to leave her education in half to become a full time wife. His mother lives with him in his Perry Road house. They have a daughter Sara and a son Arjun. He can speak Marathi, English and Hindi fluently. Tendulkar lives in a bunglow of Mumbai’s suburb Bandra. The bungalow is like a building and located near Perry road. He reads Marathi newspaper.

  • Beliefs

Tendulkar is a practising Hindu. He is a Maharashtrian, He celebrates Maharashtra’s festivals such as Gudhi Padwa, Raksha Bandhan. He also celibrates Diwali festival. He is a devotee of the deity Ganesha and has been a devotee of Sathya Sai Baba of Puttaparthi, whom he visited for the first time in 1997, during the Sri Sathya Sai Unity Cup match between India XI and World XI, at the Sri Sathya Sai hill view stadium. In 1997, Tendulkar captained the Indian National side, playing against a World Eleven team, in the Unity Cup which was held at the Sri Sathya Sai Hill View Stadium in Puttaparthi, in Baba’s presence. The death of Sai Baba on Tendulkar’s 38th birthday caused him to cancel his celebrations. The cricketer is also known to celebrate Ganesh Chaturthi at home and frequently visits temples during night when it is calm and quiet.


Commercial endorsements

Sachin Tendulkar has been sponsored by several brands throughout his career including Boost (1990–present), Pepsi (1992–2009), Action Shoes (1995–2000), MRF (1999–2009), Adidas (2000–10), Britannia (2001–07), Fiat Palio (2001–03), TVS (2002–05), ESPN Star Sports (2002–present), Sunfeast (2007–13), Canon (2006–09), Airtel (2004–06), Rorito (2016–18), G-Hanz (2005–07), Sanyo BPL (2007–present), Toshiba (2010–present), Colgate-Palmolive, Philips,VISA, Castrol India (2011–12), Ujala Techno Bright, Coca-Cola (2011–13), Musafir.com (2013–present), and Paytm First Games (2020–present).

He has also been a spokesperson for National Egg Coordination Committee (2003–05) AIDS Awareness Campaign (2005) and Luminous India (2010–present). 


Service and philanthropy

Tendulkar has been associated with UNICEF. He lent his support to spread AIDS awareness. In 2003, he worked for UNICEF’s initiative to spread awareness about Polio disease and promote Polio prevention in India. Since 2008 he is involved in UNICEF’s initiative to create and promote hygiene and sanitation

In 2016, When Tendulkar was a Rajyasabha MP, on the request letter for fund from a school, Swarnamoyee Sasmal Shiksha Niketan of West madinapore, West Bengal, Tendulkar released 70- 76 lakh rupees from his Members of Parliament Local Area Development Scheme fund to the school. 

He was one of the first nine celebrities appointed by the Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi to spread awareness regarding cleanliness and make Swachh Bharat Mission (Clean India Mission) a people’s movement. The cricketer accepted the nomination and posted a video of sweeping a street with his friends in Mumbai. In 2017, he joined hands with Aditya Thackeray and sanitation workers to clean the Bandra Fort to contribute to Swachhata Hi Seva (cleanliness is service) campaign. In 2019, he was awarded the most effective Swachhta Ambassador by India Today Group’s fifth edition of Safaigiri awards for using his popularity and fame to promote cleanliness and ensure the country achieves its goal of a Swachh Bharat. On the occasion of the World Nature Conservation day 2020, the cricketer took to twitter to spread message about the preservation of biodiversity. 

Tendulkar sponsors 200 underprivileged children every year through Apnalaya, a Mumbai-based NGO associated with his mother-in-law, Annabel Mehta. A request by him on Twitter raised ₹10.2 million (US$140,000) through Sachin’s crusade against cancer for the Crusade against Cancer foundation. Sachin Tendulkar spent nine hours on the 12-hour Coca-Cola-NDTV Support My School telethon on 18 September 2011 that helped raise ₹70 million (US$930,000) to ₹20 million (US$270,000) more than the target—for the creation of basic facilities, particularly toilets for girl students, in 140 government schools across the country. 

8 February 2020, he played in a charity match organised in Australia to raise fund for Australian bushfire victims. The match named as ‘Bushfire Cricket Bash’. 

In March 2020, He donated 25 lakh rupees in Prime minister relief fund and 25 lakh rupees for Chief minister relief fund of Maharashtra in the initial months of Covid-19 spred. He was one of the first few sportspersons of India, who came forward to donate money to relief Covid-19 disease in India. 

On 15 June 2021, on the occasion of world blood donar day, he donated blood in a hospital and appealed peoples to donate blood by using social media. he urges everyone who can to donate blood and tried to spred awareness for blood donation. 

On 29 April 2021 during 2nd wave of Covid-19 pandemic in India, he donated 1 crore rupees to buy oxygen concentrator devices. He donated to a Mission oxygen group, who have set up a fund raising initiative to import Oxygen concentrator devices and donate it to the hospitals all over the India. 

In November 2021, He donated retinal cameras to a hospital in Assam of North East India. This device can be used to diagnose Retinopathy of prematurity. 


Autobiography

Sachin Tendulkar’s autobiography, Playing It My Way, was released on 6 November 2014. It was listed in the 2016 Limca Book of Records for breaking the record for adult hardback pre-publication orders, with 1,50,289 copies confirmed.


Biographies

  • Books

Sachin Tendulkar has been the subject of various books. The following is the listing of books focused on Tendulkar’s career:

  • Playing It My WayISBN 978-14-736-0520-6 an autobiography book in English. 
  • Sachin: The Story of the World’s Greatest Batsman by Gulu Ezekiel. Publisher: Penguin Global. ISBN 978-0-14-302854-3
  • Sachin Tendulkar Opus
  • The A to Z of Sachin Tendulkar by Gulu Ezekiel. Publisher: Penguin Global. ISBN 978-81-7476-530-7
  • Sachin Tendulkar-a definitive biography by Vaibhav Purandare. Publisher: Roli Books. ISBN 81-7436-360-2
  • Sachin Tendulkar – Masterful by Peter Murray, Ashish Shukla. Publisher: Rupa. ISBN 81-7167-806-8
  • If Cricket is a Religion, Sachin is God by Vijay Santhanam, Shyam Balasubramanian. Publisher: HarperCollins India ISBN 978-81-7223-821-6
  • Master Stroke: 100 Centuries of Sachin Tendulkar by Neelima Athalye. Publisher: Sakal Publications. ISBN 978-93-80571-84-3
  • Dhruvtara, a book on cricket maestro Sachin Tendulkar, was launched as an audio book on Monday, 15 October 2012 to mark White Cane Day 
  • Sachin ke sau shatak by Dharmender Panth, a book on Tendulkar’s 100 centuries written in Hindi. ISBN 9788123765242
  • Sachin: A Hundred Hundreds Now by V. Krishnaswamy

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